Archive | February, 2014

Should You Reschedule an Interview for Illness?

27 Feb

Yesterday, while attempting to avoid squishing my smallest dog, the couch jumped up and tackled my toe.

It was a massacre.

One that ice cream and ice packs helped to remedy, but it got me thinking. What would I have done had I broken my foot prior to an interview? What is the proper procedure for an unexpected, unplanned (embarrassingly clumsy) assault on your physical self when you’ve got the interview of a lifetime lined up for bright an early the next morning? What steps do candidates take when they come down with the flu prior to an interview for that matter?

I took to the interwebs to research the topic, and the consensus according to our friendly staffing cohorts is unanimous:

Unless you’re maimed beyond recognition, in a coma, or just really don’t want the position, never reschedule an interview for the sniffles or banged up appendage. 

Here are a few friendly tips to get through an interview when you’re not feeling like a Rockstar:

1. Medicate! Motrin, Advil Sinus, Imodium, whatever. Take something to alleviate the symptoms and move on; Also, do something to pep yourself up (caffeinate!),when you’re feeling worn down. 

2. Dress for Success. Look as presentable as possible despite the illness or injury. Dress to Kill and you’ll feel a lot better.  

3. Showing up is half the battle. Show up as scheduled. Mention the situation in passing to the manager you meet with, but don’t play for sympathy points. Stoicism wins this round and indicates how badly you want the gig.

4. Never Procrastinate. If you’ve been preparing for this interview before hand (as you should!) then a last minute illness won’t knock you off your A Game. 

As always, thoughts, comments, differing opinions welcome! What do you think? is there ever a time you should cancel an interview last minute?

Emma

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Tackling the Salary Expectations Question in an Interview

4 Feb

This is especially vital for women to remember, as we tend to accept what is offered. Don’t be afraid of asking for what you’re worth. Do your research!

Something Different HR

1. This is a misuse of the word travail, but it delighted me to use it here.I’m writing this one because during my daily travails 1 across the internet in search of new information about HR, I have comeacrossmanyarticles on salary negotiation. Some of the advice I agree with, some of it I don’t… and most all of it will work in one situation or another.

…So of course I also want to share my 2 cents.

As a former comp guy that has interviewed hundreds of people for positions spanning a fairly wide range of job functions, complexity, and scope – and that has asked nearly just as many their salary expectations at some point during the interview process – I can say two things with a fairly high degree of certainty:

1. When asked for their salary expectations, currently employed people are more likely…

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